20+ Places to cash a cashier’s check near you in 2024

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Let’s first understand what a cashier’s check is and why it’s sometimes preferred over a regular check. Afterward, we’ll list places to cash a cashier’s check.

Cashier’s checks, also referred to as official checks, remain a preferred choice for sizable transactions. Despite the popularity of debit cards, credit cards, and digital payment platforms such as PayPal or Venmo, cashier’s checks are commonly utilized in various transactions.

Cashier’s checks are commonly employed for buying cars and boats or making home down payments. They’re preferred for substantial transactions over personal checks as they are more reliable.

Whether you’ve sold a car and have a cashier’s check to cash or for any other reason, it’s essential to know where you can cash it.

What is a Cashier’s Check?

Cashier’s checks are checks guaranteed by a bank, drawn from the bank’s funds, not the purchaser’s.

The bank issues cashier’s checks in its name and pays the specified amount to the payee. These checks, usually signed by a teller, are preferred for significant transactions, such as those in real estate and brokerage.

How do Cashier’s checks work?

When you get a cashier’s check, it’s guaranteed not to bounce, unlike personal checks, as it’s backed by the bank. These checks are exclusively available for purchase at banks or credit unions.

The person paying for the cashier’s check, known as the remitter, requests it, and the financial institution then verifies that the remitter has sufficient funds in their account to cover the specified amount.

The required amount is taken from the remitter’s account and transferred to the bank’s account.

After the remitter pays the required amount, the bank or credit union prints a cashier’s check with your name as the payee and the designated payment amount.

Instead of the remitter’s bank account and routing number, the bank or credit union’s account number is printed on the cashier’s check.

When you, as the payee, deposit a cashier’s check, the funds are withdrawn from the bank’s account.

Why use a Cashier’s Check?

Cashier’s checks are generally a preferred payment method to regular personal checks. They offer enhanced benefits and protections that surpass those provided by cash payments or personal checks.

There are several reasons to use a cashier’s check:

  • Faster clearance: Cashier’s checks typically clear more quickly than regular checks.
  • Secure for large transactions: Backed by a bank or credit union, cashier’s checks are preferred for larger transactions.
  • No bouncing risk: Authentic cashier’s checks have no risk of bouncing, providing assurance when cashing them.
  • Guaranteed funds: With guaranteed funds, cashier’s checks are considered safer than personal checks.

Where to cash a Cashier’s Check near you

If you possess a cashier’s check, you have multiple deposit options available for depositing it.

Banks and credit unions

The optimal place to cash a cashier’s check is your local bank or credit union.

You can deposit a cashier’s check at:

  • The bank or credit union that issued the check: If convenient, it’s a great choice, as they use their own funds to pay, allowing non-members to cash the check.
  • Your own bank or credit union: Deposit the check where you have an account. Even if they didn’t issue it, your bank can provide cash or deposit the funds. If you’re a member, this is the preferred option, as it’s often fee-free.
  • Any bank, regardless of issuance or membership: Many banks cash cashier’s checks for non-customers, albeit with potential fees for non-members.

Below is a list of banks and credit unions where you can cash a cashier’s check:

1. Bank of America

  • Fee: $8 for non-customers.
  • Requirements: Two forms of ID.

2. Chartway Federal Credit Union

  • Fee: For non-customers, $3 or 2% of the check, whichever is greater.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

3. Chase Bank

  • Fee: $8 for non-customers.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

4. Citibank

  • Fee: No fees for account holders or checks up to $5,000; fees vary otherwise.
  • Requirements: Two forms of ID.

5. HSBC

  • Fee: $3 for checks up to $100, $5 for larger checks for non-customers.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

6. KeyBank

  • Fee: 1% of the check amount (non-customers).
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

7. PenFed Credit Union

  • Fee: None.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

8. PNC Bank

  • Fee: None.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

9. Regions Bank

  • Fee: 4% of the check amount.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

10. TD Bank

  • Fee: $7 (non-customers).
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

11. U.S. Bank

  • Fee: $7 for non-customers.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

12. Wells Fargo

  • Fee: $7.50 (non-customers).
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

Check cashing stores

You can cash a cashier’s check at a check cashing store, which accepts various types of checks. Keep in mind that a fee is charged for this service. Fees differ among locations, so it’s advisable to call in advance to inquire about the specific cost of cashing a cashier’s check.

Some locations provide diverse financial services, including check cashing, payday loans (best avoided if possible), installment loans, and money transfers.

Here is a list of financial service companies where you can cash cashier’s checks.

13. ACE Cash Express

  • Fee: Starting at 2%, varies by location.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.
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14. Advance Financial

  • Fee: 1% to 5% of the check amount.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

15. Check ‘n Go

  • Fee: Starting at 2% of the check amount.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

16. Check Into Cash

  • Fee: 3% to 5% of the check amount. Varies by location.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

17. Money Mart

  • Fee: Varies by location.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

18. Moneytree

  • Fee: Up to 6% of the check amount. Varies by location.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

19. Pay-O-Matic

  • Fee: Around 2% of the check amount.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

20. PLS Check Cashing

  • Fee: Starts at $1 plus 1% of the check amount.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

21. Speedy Cash

  • Fee: Starts at $2.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

22. The Check Cashing Store

  • Fee: Varies by location, amount, and check type.
  • Requirements: Two forms of ID.

23. USA Check Cashing Store

  • Fee: Varies by check amount, location, and check type.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

Retail stores

Some retail stores offer the service of cashing money orders and cashier’s checks. This provides convenience, allowing you to cash your check while doing your regular shopping.

Here are a few retail stores where you can cash cashier’s checks:

24. Walmart

  • Fee: $3 for checks up to $1,000 and $6 for checks valued between $1,000 and $5,000.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

25. H-E-B

  • Fee: $3 for checks up to $3,000. Fees vary for larger checks.
  • Requirements: Photo ID.

How to deposit a Cashier’s Check online

In today’s era, you can conveniently cash a check from the comfort of your home.

Visiting your bank or credit union during regular business hours can be challenging, especially when they close before your workday ends. Similarly, going to a check-cashing place or retail store might be inconvenient during a busy week.

That’s where online check cashing becomes a practical solution. You can effortlessly cash your check using your phone without going anywhere.

Cashing a check online is a bit different from doing it in person. When you go to a physical location like a bank or a check cashing store, you can deposit the check into your bank account or get cash immediately. It’s a direct cashing process.

On the other hand, when you cash a check online, you’ll deposit the funds into your bank account instead of receiving cash on the spot. If you need immediate cash, it’s better to visit your bank or a nearby check cashing or retail store.

But if you’re okay with having the funds deposited into your bank, cashing your check online is a convenient option.

You can deposit a cashier’s check online using the following apps:

Cashier’s Check scams

Beware of cashier’s check scams to protect yourself from becoming a victim. In these scams, someone you may not know will ask you to deposit a check and then send a portion of the money to another person. They typically provide a reason, like covering taxes or fees, to justify not keeping all the money.

Fake checks can take various forms, often resembling personal or cashier’s checks. Whether it’s a personal or cashier’s check, it’s crucial to be vigilant when depositing to avoid falling prey to scams.

Types of fake check scams

Various scams involve the use of counterfeit cashier’s checks, and some are particularly prevalent.

Here are a few common examples:

Mystery shopping scam

Beware of a scam where the fraudster poses as an employer offering a mystery shopping opportunity. The scam involves instructing the shopper to assess a store selling money orders, gift cards, or money transfer services like MoneyGram or Western Union.

The shopper gets a cashier’s check, asked to deposit it into their personal bank account, and then wire the funds to another person. Unfortunately, after the money is wired, the recipient can vanish, leaving the shopper at a loss.

Personal assistant scam

Beware of scammers posing as employers for virtual assistant positions. They may hire you online and provide a check for purchasing gift cards or client-related supplies. Once you share the gift card PINs, they quickly use them, leaving you without funds when the bank discovers the fraudulent check.

Car wrap decal scam

Fraudsters deceive individuals looking for car wrap advertising by instructing them to deposit cashier’s checks and send money to non-existent decal installers.

The sweepstake scam

Beware of the sweepstake scam involving cashier’s checks. Scammers falsely claim you’ve won a sweepstake, provide you with a bogus check, and instruct you to send money for taxes, shipping, or processing fees. Legitimate sweepstakes do not require such payments.

The overpayment scam

Beware of an online scam targeting sellers. Scammers pose as buyers, offering to purchase items from you. After making a payment, they send a check with an excess amount and claim it as an accident. Subsequently, they request you to refund the extra balance.

Why do fake check scams work?

Beware of fake cashier’s checks, as they can closely resemble genuine ones and may even deceive bank staff. These fraudulent checks often feature the names and addresses of legitimate financial institutions or could be authentic checks from accounts compromised through identity theft.

Detecting a fake check can take weeks for a bank, allowing scammers to receive any funds you’ve sent. Consequently, you’ll be responsible for repaying the bank.

To avoid falling victim to scams, never send money to unfamiliar individuals, as illustrated in the scams mentioned earlier. Only accept funds from checks if you are familiar and trust the person you’re transacting with.

Tips for avoiding fake Cashier’s Check scams

Here are some straightforward tips to help you avoid falling victim to a fake check scam:

Don’t send money

Avoid using funds from a check to send money orders, gift cards, or wire money to strangers or individuals you’ve recently encountered.

Scammers often instruct victims to purchase gift cards and share the PINs, or to transfer money via services such as MoneyGram or Western Union. Retrieving funds becomes nearly impossible once you’ve provided the gift card PINs or completed the money transfer.

Avoid sweepstakes that ask you to pay for the prize

A genuine sweepstake will never require payment to claim your prize. The essence of a sweepstake is to offer free prizes, eliminating the need for any payment on your part.

Never accept a check for more than the selling price

Be cautious if someone online offers to pay significantly more than your selling price; it’s likely a scam. Avoid accepting checks exceeding the item’s value.

Avoid jobs where you’re asked to use a cashier’s check to make purchases or send money

A genuine mystery shopping company or personal assistant job typically doesn’t provide a cashier’s check for purchasing items or transferring money. Cashier’s checks are usually reserved for significant transactions, such as real estate deals.

The bottom line

Cashier’s checks can be obtained exclusively from banks and credit unions. However, cashing them is convenient, as it can be done at financial institutions, check-cashing stores, and certain retail establishments.

If you’re wondering where to cash a cashier’s check nearby, refer to the locations mentioned in our list.